A comparison of the varying ideas of niccolo machiavelli and jean jacques rousseau

Rousseau Vs. Machiavelli

Still, politics remained his main passion and, to satisfy this interest, he maintained a well-known correspondence with more politically connected friends, attempting to become involved once again in political life.

In The Prince, the Discourses, and in the Life of Castruccio Castracanihe describes "prophets", as he calls them, like MosesRomulusCyrus the Greatand Theseus he treated pagan and Christian patriarchs in the same way as the greatest of new princes, the glorious and brutal founders of the most novel innovations in politics, and men whom Machiavelli assures us have always used a large amount of armed force and murder against their own people.

Rousseau devotes many pages to explaining the methods the tutor must use. In general, a profusion of classes and degrees of wealth and status leaves most moderns—not just Florentines—unsure to what degree they are dominating or seeking to avoid domination.

Indeed, he decided to return to that city, repudiate his Catholicism, and seek readmission to the Protestant church. At the forefront of the political debate were well-versed men such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau.

Strauss argues that the way Machiavelli combines classical ideas is new.

Confucius, Machiavelli and Rousseau : studies in contrast

Because this is to be asserted in general of men, that they are ungrateful, fickle, false, cowardly, covetous, and as long as you succeed they are yours entirely; they will offer you their blood, property, life and children, as is said above, when the need is far distant; but when it approaches they turn against you.

Thus, Rousseau regards inequality not as a separate problem but as one of the features of the long process by which men become alienated from nature and from innocence. For example, Machiavelli denies that living virtuously necessarily leads to happiness. Invasions, corruption, and instable governments marked this time period.

These authors tended to cite Tacitus as their source for realist political advice, rather than Machiavelli, and this pretense came to be known as " Tacitism ". Rousseau, however, represents this act as a form of exchange of rights whereby people give up natural rights in return for civil rights.

Strauss concludes his Thoughts on Machiavelli by proposing that this promotion of progress leads directly to the modern arms race.

It is like fixing upon a given card and demanding an expert player never discard it from his hand: These were the English cardinal Reginald Pole and the Portuguese bishop Jeronymo Osorioboth of whom lived for many years in Italy, and the Italian humanist and later bishop, Ambrogio Caterino Politi.

For Adams, Machiavelli restored empirical reason to politics, while his analysis of factions was commendable. The Prince made the word "Machiavellian" a byword for deceit, despotism, and political manipulation. Najemy has argued that this same approach can be found in Machiavelli's approach to love and desire, as seen in his comedies and correspondence.

After he had been expelled from France, he was chased from canton to canton in Switzerland. Strauss argued that the unavoidable nature of such arms races, which have existed before modern times and led to the collapse of peaceful civilisations, provides us with both an explanation of what is most truly dangerous in Machiavelli's innovations, but also the way in which the aims of his apparently immoral innovation can be understood.

He also accepted Machiavelli's belief that all societies were subject to cyclical periods of growth and decay. And indeed, Rousseau does seem to have recovered his peace of mind in his last years, when he was once again afforded refuge on the estates of great French noblemen, first the Prince de Conti and then the Marquis de Girardin, in whose park at Ermenonville he died.

For example, quite early in the Discourses, in Book I, chapter 4a chapter title announces that the disunion of the plebs and senate in Rome "kept Rome free. Religion[ edit ] Machiavelli explains repeatedly that he saw religion as man-made, and that the value of religion lies in its contribution to social order and the rules of morality must be dispensed with if security requires it.

The ineluctable reality, after all, is that modern societies are broken into too many classes to give much force to a politics built on a bipartite vision of society whether classical or Marxist.

Even if Machiavelli was not himself evil, Leo Strauss declared himself inclined toward the traditional view that Machiavelli was self-consciously a "teacher of evil," since he counsels the princes to avoid the values of justice, mercy, temperance, wisdom, and love of their people in preference to the use of cruelty, violence, fear, and deception.

The most important was his Confessionsmodeled on the work of the same title by St. Even if Machiavelli was not himself evil, Leo Strauss declared himself inclined toward the traditional view that Machiavelli was self-consciously a "teacher of evil," since he counsels the princes to avoid the values of justice, mercy, temperance, wisdom, and love of their people in preference to the use of cruelty, violence, fear, and deception.The Varying Ideas of Two Great Minds Machiavelli’s and Rousseau’s ideas about government and the people who make it up vary widely.

Niccolò Machiavelli stresses the idea. Confucius, Machiavelli and Rousseau: studies in contrast --The analects of Confucius --Niccolo Machiavelli's The Prince --Jean-Jacques Rousseau's The social contract. Series Title: Hartwick classic leadership cases. A systematic comparison is made between the respective political theories of Machiavelli and Rousseau.

Initially, the comparison centres upon key substantive claims made by each theorist with a view to estab lishing a general, thematic contrast. This is used as a basis for structur ing a further comparison between the respective authorial standpoints adopted by Machiavelli and Rousseau.

Modern Political Theory: Rousseau and Machiavelli Essay. Words 4 Pages. John Locke and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s political philosophies and theories each differ from one another’s, but these three philosophers have all staked their claims as to what man would be like, prior to the formation of the state.

More about Modern. On the other hand, "The Origin of Civil Society," an essay written by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, a significant modern philosopher, infocuses on the issue of the nature and right of man both in a natural and civilized society and thus conveys the ideas of Rousseau about what a legitimate government with a stable basis should be based on.

12) The Social Contract By Jean-Jacques Rousseau Rousseau lived in a time when the absolutist monarchies of Europe had reached their zenith. The ruler had nearly unlimited power, without any significant restriction, counterweight or checks and balances that could control him.

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A comparison of the varying ideas of niccolo machiavelli and jean jacques rousseau
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